Library

All of the publications that we share are freely available on the web – we’ve just collated those that we feel you may find helpful.

Please note, although we collate these documents for you, it remains your responsibility to ensure any document you use is the most up-to-date version.

External Fire Spread – What is the Risk and what Does it Mean for the Safety of Residents

A guide to PAS 9980:2022 Fire risk appraisal of external wall construction and cladding of existing blocks of flats.

Aimed specifically at the safety of existing blocks of flats, its purpose is to provide a methodology and framework for conducting appraisals of the fire risk posed by combustible external wall construction and cladding. These differ from assessments carried out under the EWS1 scheme, which is to inform valuation and therefore lending decisions, and their focus is risk-based professional judgement. They represent a shift from compliance-based assessments, which have tended to be founded on generic prescriptive requirements.

RC59 – Fire Safety When Charging Electric Vehicles

This document has been developed through the RISCAuthority and published by the Fire Protection Association (FPA).

This document aims to provide practical guidance to insurers and their clients on fire hazards and appropriate control measures associated with the charging of electric vehicles, bicycles and similar devices in public places; on commercial and industrial premises; and within or in the vicinity of residential premises such as blocks of flats, care homes and sheltered accommodation.

Personal Emergency Evacuation General Residential Premises

Assessment of evacuation procedures from a personal level, to ensure the safe escape of any individual from fire, is a critical component of any fire risk assessment – it represents a key part of a founding principle – the preservation of life. Evacuation procedures, with the associated provision of safe routes of escape to a place of ultimate safety, must therefore be inherent and a clear part of any building’s fire safety strategy.

This guide and check-list has been prepared primarily to assist fire risk assessors. It has no formal or legal status. It has been developed within the fire sector industry in the absence of other guidance using the format of a check list. The questions, which may be selected as appropriate by the competent fire risk assessor, are designed to assist individual fire risk assessors as an aide-memoire.

The idea of the check-list is to set out questions which can then be interpreted by the fire risk assessor and used in discussions with their clients to explore and determine what actions, if any, appear appropriate for the building under assessment. Questions selected should have recorded answers.

The Status of PAS 79-2 & LGA Fire safety in purpose-built blocks of flats guide

PAS 79-2 was originally published in December 2020. It was produced at the request of the housing sector, who considered that there was a need for dedicated guidance on fire risk assessments for housing premises, and for a “tailor-made” template on which to record the significant findings of these fire risk assessments. As in the case of every PAS, it was independently authored, with the work of the technical authors overseen by a steering group of stakeholders, one of which was, in the case of PAS 79-2, the FIA. Following publication, BSI received a complaint regarding the text of PAS 79-2 in relation to evacuation of disabled people from blocks of flats.

As an interim measure, BSI have made the original PAS 79-2 available for download, free of charge. However, all references to disabled people have been redacted from the document, including advice regarding the need to provide disabled people with a facility to discuss their evacuation in the event of fire.

Fire safety in purpose-built blocks of flats

This guide was produced in 2011 and summarised the legislation, guidance and best practice at the time of writing, as such it should be viewed as no longer comprehensive. The Home Office is currently working on a revised version of this guide which we intend to publish in early 2022. In the interim, it is continued to be made available to fire safety professionals as it contains relevant and useful information for purpose-built blocks of flats.

Code of Practice for the Provision of Premises Information Boxes in Residential Buildings

This code of practice has been prepared jointly by the Fire Industry Association (FIA) and the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) with the assistance of the other organisations set out in the Acknowledgements section. The code of practice is intended to support new legislation and guidance proposed to be introduced by the Government in response to the recommendations in the Phase 1 report of the Grenfell Tower Inquiry.

The report recommended that premises information boxes (PIBs) should be provided in all high-rise residential buildings. The report also recommended that the contents of PIBs should include various information that will be of value to firefighters during an emergency.

Firestopping of service Penetrations

Since the tragic fire at Grenfell Tower in the summer of 2017, fire safety has become a major industry focus. Service penetrations in fire-separating elements are in part a minor element of a compartment wall or floor, yet in truth they are one of the most important elements when it comes to ensuring the performance of any compartment wall or floor is maintained.

This document is the result of a collaboration between a number of relevant trade bodies and organisations representing the wider construction and fire safety industries, and it is an example of the collaborative working and acceptance of professional responsibility throughout the supply chain that must become a feature of the industry’s culture from now on.

Withdrawn: Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings

Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings.

This advice recognises that all building owners or those responsible for a building want to ensure their buildings are safe and have existing obligations in this regard.

Whilst this document is now withdrawn, it provides reference to previous requirements and a benchmark standard.

Withdrawn: Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings – Annex A

Annex A to Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings, dated January 2020.

This advice recognises that all building owners or those responsible for a building want to ensure their buildings are safe and have existing obligations in this regard. This supplementary note relates to elements of the advice which cover external wall systems, including balconies.

Whilst this document is now withdrawn, it provides reference to previous requirements and a benchmark standard.

Withdrawn: Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings – Supplementary Note

Supplementary note to Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings, dated January 2020.

This advice recognises that all building owners or those responsible for a building want to ensure their buildings are safe and have existing obligations in this regard. This supplementary note relates to elements of the advice which cover external wall systems, including balconies.

Whilst this document is now withdrawn, it provides reference to previous requirements and a benchmark standard.

Approved Code of Practice – A National Framework for Fire Risk Assessor Competency

This Approved Code of Practice has been prepared by a working group of fi re risk assessors who assembled at the invitation of the Fire Sector Federation to consider the implications of competency raised by Building a Safer Future Report1 .

This report was produced in May 2018 by Dame Judith Hackitt DBE FREng following the Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety that followed the tragic Grenfell Tower fire, which occurred on 14 June 2017.

 

A Guide to Choosing a Competent Fire Risk Assessor

The Fire Risk Assessment Competency Council was formed in 2011 and involved many major stakeholders concerned with this aspect of the fire safety sector. The Fire Sector Federation Competency Workstream assumed responsibility for FRACC in 2016.

This guide is intended as an easy to read introduction to choosing a competent fire risk assessor. The Federation has and continues to publish further information, including criteria against which the competency of those undertaking fire risk assessments can be judged. These document are regularly updated and care should be taken to ensure that the most recent version is used.

Installation of Fire Rated Doorsets

This manual will provide guidance for the preparation, installation and maintenance of a fire rated doorset or door assembly that uses a Falcon Panel Products’ door core or door blank.

Always follow the doorset manufacturer’s installation instructions. This manual is written to compliment general advice from manufacturers, but should not be used in isolation or as a substitute for manufacturer’s installation instructions.

Guidance on CE Marking, Third Party Testing, Assessment and Certification

This Technical Briefing has been written to explain the essential differences between CE marking, third party testing, assessment and certification. It has been written jointly by GAI (Guild of Architectural Ironmongers) and DHF (Door & Hardware Federation).

The CE mark is a legal declaration by a manufacturer that a product complies with one or more European single market directives or regulations. There are some two dozen of these, ranging from medical devices to toys. Products displaying the CE mark must be accepted on the market in all European countries (although national governments retain the ability to regulate how the products are used).

Door Closer Safety – 10 Point Checklist

The UK Government has issued building safety advice for building owners on the measures they should take to ensure their buildings are safe. This advice included specific information on fire doors. In Annex A, which provides advice on assurance and assessment of flat entrance fire doors it states the following:

“It is important that all fire doors, including the compulsory closers, are routinely maintained by a suitably qualified professional. Residents should be made aware of the importance of a working self-closing device on all fire doors which under any circumstances should not be altered.”

BWF Fire Door Alliance Fire Doors and Doorsets – Best Practice Guide

BWF Fire Door Alliance: The leading authority on fire door safety A fire door is a vital safety device engineered to save lives and property. The correct specification, supply, fitting and maintenance are critical and the responsibility of each and every person in the process.

It’s only when a fire breaks out that the consequences of poorly manufactured or fitted fire doors are known. This Best Practice Guide has been prepared by the British Woodworking Federation (BWF Fire Door Alliance) Fire Door Scheme. It is the complete reference source for everything that you and your customer need to know about third party certificated timber fire doors and doorsets.

A Guide for Selecting Flat Entrance Doorsets

Following the tragedy of Grenfell Tower in June 2017, several not for profit organisations with expertise in doorsets and fire safety have come together to provide guidance that will explain what to look for in a flat entrance doorset, how this relates to latest advice supplied by Government (MHCLG) and why third-party certification of fire doorset manufacture, installation and maintenance is a critical part of fire protection.

This guidance only applies when specifying, purchasing, or installing new doorsets.

Door Chains and Limiters

The need for a specification for door chains, limiters, etc. arose because such products were increasingly being referred to in other standards, codes of practice, and such, but there was no official guidance to indicate what level of performance they should achieve.

The first version addressed this need but was far too complicated with up to 5 grades in each category, whereas all that specifiers wanted it seems, were simple pass/fail criteria. This latest version does not have any grades, nor does it have requirements for suitability for use on fire/smoke doors, or corrosion resistance. As a result, it is easier to understand and the cost of testing is considerably reduced.

Door Viewers

For many years now, door viewers have been referred to in standards, codes of practice, etc but without any official guidance to indicate how well they should perform or how their performance should be measured. This Technical Specification was written to address those issues and provide manufacturers and specifiers with a means to distinguish “fit for purpose” products from cheap “look-alikes”.

TS 002 has been available on the dhf website since November 2005 and whilst there does not appear to be a strong enough case for a British standard, interested parties within the security industry continue to show support and it is in response to those interests that this revision has been prepared.

Enhanced Specification For Doorsets

Specification for enhanced lifetime & severe duty performance of hinged and pivoted doorsets.

This performance specification does not replace any existing performance specification. Approval against the requirements of this performance specification was possible from 2010.